Friday, June 21

Technology

Elon Musk got 72% in Tesla shareholder vote on pay
Technology

Elon Musk got 72% in Tesla shareholder vote on pay

More news - Breaking news With the pay package, Musk would own 20.5% of Tesla, up from about 13%. He has said he would like a 25% stake, stressing in January that it would be "quite influential, but not so much that it can't be overthrown." If he didn't get such a large stake, he said, "he would rather build products outside of Tesla." Even after this week's rally, Tesla shares are down more than 20% this year, compared with a 14% gain in the broader stock market. The company remains by far the most valuable auto company, with a stock market value of $600 billion, but fears of tougher competition and declining demand for its models have weighed on the stock. At Thursday's shareholder meeting, Musk was characteristically optimistic about Tesla's self-driving technology, including t...
How to manage your streaming subscriptions as service prices increase
Technology

How to manage your streaming subscriptions as service prices increase

More news - Latest news Because we forget to unsubscribe In May, Caroline Sinders, a designer and artist, published the results of an independent study on how companies like Netflix, Hulu, Vimeo and The New York Times make it difficult to unsubscribe from their services. The study, conducted in 2022, found that some media companies like The Times created friction in the process, requiring, in some cases, a phone call to cancel a subscription. The Times now allows subscribers to unsubscribe online without calling. Even though the study found that streaming services like Netflix and Hulu were easier to cancel, you may stay subscribed longer than you want because of what they don't do, Mx. Sinders said. They don't send emails to remind you that you have an invoice coming up. When yo...
The rise and fall of BNN Breaking, an AI-generated news channel
Technology

The rise and fall of BNN Breaking, an AI-generated news channel

More news - Recent news A closer look, however, would have revealed that individual BNN journalists were publishing long stories as many as multiple times a minute, writing in generic prose familiar to anyone who has tinkered with the AI ​​chatbot ChatGPT. BNN's "About Us" page featured an image of four children looking at a computer, some bearing the gnarled fingers that are a telltale sign of an AI-generated image. The ease with which the site and its errors entered the ecosystem for legitimate news highlights a growing concern: AI-generated content is disrupting, and often poisoning, the supply of information online. Many traditional news organizations are already struggling for traffic and advertising dollars. For years they have competed for clicks with journalism about the pi...
How to trace your ancestors using free tools on your phone
Technology

How to trace your ancestors using free tools on your phone

Related media - Recent news Spending time in cemeteries and libraries may not be everyone's idea of ​​summer fun, but for those interested in finding their roots, gathering information about their ancestors AND a “family” holiday. Sure, genealogy sites have made researching ancestral history much easier with digitized record archives, family tree building software, and community forums. Hand Nothing it's online. As you visit libraries, archives, and cemeteries in search of your roots, keep your smartphone or tablet handy—it can help with translation tools, document scanners, and more. Here are some tips that can make your research trips more efficient. Decipher the text Old newspapers, religious documents, gravestones, and official government documents (preserved in an analog arch...
California proposes 30 AI regulatory laws amid federal gridlock
Technology

California proposes 30 AI regulatory laws amid federal gridlock

Related media - Recent news California lawmakers last month advanced about 30 new AI measures aimed at protecting consumers and jobs, one of the largest efforts yet to regulate the new technology. The bills aim to impose the toughest nationwide restrictions on artificial intelligence, which some technologists warn could kill entire categories of jobs, throw elections into chaos with misinformation and pose national security risks. California's proposals, many of which have won broad support, include rules to prevent AI tools from discriminating in housing and health services. They also aim to protect intellectual property and jobs. The California legislature, which is expected to vote on the proposed laws by Aug. 31, has already helped shape U.S. tech consumer protections. In 2020...